News for You

Growing a Better Relationship

Relationships can come in many shapes and sizes – they can be between friends, coworkers, acquaintances or, as many people think of during February, romantic partners. Regardless of who you have a relationship with in your life, everyone can benefit from learning how to strengthen their bonds and grow their relationships. To help start your Valentine’s Day without a thorn in your side, here are some tips to help you grow your relationships:

  1. Love yourself – Even though we should be showing love to our significant other, you have to be able to love yourself first for any relationship to be successful. Being comfortable in your own skin can help you to be more attuned to others.
  2. Talk, TALK, TALK!! – Communication is key, and this goes for any relationship, personal or professional. Having an open line of communication allows everyone involved to express their feelings and for a more constructive approach to resolving any conflicts.
  3. Honesty is key – Being truthful and honest in a relationship is one of the most important things to help relationships work. Without honestly, there can be no trust which can leave a serious strain on your relationships.
  4. Give some space – Spending quality time with your relationships can be a great thing, especially with a significant other. However, everyone needs some space and alone time to get their thoughts together, de-stress or just to get some work done. Don’t be afraid to ask for some space if you’re feeling overwhelmed or be upset if someone asks to be left alone.
  5. Support them, even if you don’t always agree – No matter how hard you try, how much you talk or how honest you are, chances are you aren’t always going to agree on every little thing and that’s okay! One of the most important things you can do in any relationship is to respect each other’s opinions or actions.
  6. R-E-S-P-E-C-T – As the song goes, you have to ‘find out what it means’ to you and your relationships. Things cannot last if everyone isn’t respected and seen as an equal. Don’t be afraid to have a discussion if you feel like you aren’t being respected and be honest when talking about how you feel.

Resources

  • Introducing mindfulness into your daily routine can focus your attention to live fully in the present. This will allow you to observe your thoughts and feelings and become aware of what is happening here-and-now, both internally and externally, which can help strengthen your relationships. Practicing mindfulness can also help improve both mental and physical health as well. Explore the ideas and tools within the Mindfulness Toolkit to help you get started to live more mindfully.
  • The Wellbeing Place Blog provides you with a wide array of tips, tools and resources to improve your relationships, overall health and wellbeing.
  • Additional articles, tip sheets and flash courses, such as ‘Healthy Relationships,’ can be found using the ‘What’s on Your Mind?’ search feature.

 SupportLinc Can Help

For confidential guidance, support, resources and referrals, contact SupportLinc by selecting an icon from the Access Bar on the home screen or by calling 1-888-881-5462.

 


New Year, No Worries

The start of a new year is a time for celebration. It’s a time where we put the problems of the past 365-days behind us and look forward to new things to come! At least, that’s how it’s supposed to be. Often times, the start of a new year can be a time of uncertainty for many people. Since we can’t predict the future, the fear of what may come can cause worry and stress that can impact your mental and physical health. To avoid starting the new decade feeling anxious, here are some tips to help you mentally prepare for the year ahead:

Remember things can get better. When things aren’t going exactly as one would like, people have a tendency to adopt a negative mindset. They begin to believe that their situation can’t or won’t ever change. Instead, adopting a more positive outlook and mindset on things can help you be better prepared for things to come. This change can lead you to being more proactive in achieving your goals. An example of this type of mindset could be simply asking yourself “what can I do to improve?” instead of saying “I’ll never be better.”

Make a plan. It may sound simple, but having an idea of what you would like to accomplish in the year to come can help you stay on track. Write out a list of things you want to accomplish this year and steps to take that can help you to get there. This allows you to get a better idea of what challenges you may face and how you can overcome them.

Keep it real. While making a plan is the right way to start, you’ll get nowhere if your goals for the year aren’t attainable. We all have our own hopes and dreams about what we wish could happen, however, things don’t just happen overnight. Instead, set small, reasonable goals for yourself leading up to your overall goal. Doing so can help keep you more accountable and motivated.

Find the positives in the negative. No matter what you do or how hard you try, things are not always going to go the way you want them to. Instead of dwelling on the negative side of things, try and focus on the things you accomplished. Maybe you didn’t get the job you wanted, but you were able to develop a friendly relationship with the manager. Instead of being discouraged, connect with that manager to learn what skills you may have been lacking and use it as an opportunity to improve for the next opening with the company.

Have an outlet. When you do find yourself feeling down or stressed, it is always good to have an outlet for yourself. Whether it is a passion of yours like traveling, cooking, reading or even getting coffee with a friend. Having something that you enjoy doing to unwind and take your mind off things can help you take a step back and regroup before going forward with accomplishing your goals.

Resources

Here are some recommended resources to help you start your year off better:

  • It is easy to get discouraged when things don’t go your way. Practicing resiliency can help you overcome life’s every day challenges. This Resiliency Toolkit provides education, support and other resources that can help you bounce back stronger than before.
  • Introducing mindfulness into your daily routine can help relieve symptoms of anxiety, stress and depression as well as having other benefits to both your physical and emotional health. The resources in the Mindfulness Toolkit can help you get started to live more mindfully.
  • The Wellbeing Place Blog provides you with a wide array of tips, tools and resources to improve your overall health and wellbeing.
  • Additional articles, tip sheets and flash courses such as ‘Building Resilience.’ This flash course and others can be found using the ‘What’s on your mind?’ search feature.

 SupportLinc Can Help

For confidential guidance, support, resources and referrals, contact SupportLinc by selecting an icon from the Access Bar on the home screen or by calling 1-888-881-5462.

 


Keep Calm – The Holidays are Coming!

The holidays tend to bring not just parties, presents and shopping, but an extra dose of stress along with it. When stress is at its peak, it’s hard to stop and regroup. Try to prevent stress in the first place, especially if the holidays have taken an emotional toll on you in the past. Here are some tips to help you keep a healthy perspective this holiday season:  

Acknowledge your feelings. If someone close to you has recently died or you can’t be with loved ones, realize that it’s normal to feel sadness and grief. It’s okay to take time to express your feelings. You can’t force yourself to be happy just because it’s the holiday season.

Reach out.
If you feel lonely or isolated, seek out community or other social events. They can offer support and companionship. Volunteering your time to help others is also a good way to lift your spirits and broaden your friendships.

Be realistic.
The holidays don’t have to be perfect or just like last year. As families change and grow, traditions and rituals often change as well. Choose a few to hold on to and be open to creating new ones.

Set aside differences.
Try to accept family members and friends as they are, even if they don’t live up to all your expectations. Set aside differences until a more appropriate time for discussion. Be understanding if others get upset or distressed when something goes awry because chances are, they’re feeling the effects of holiday stress and depression, too.

Stick to a budget.
Before you go gift and food shopping, decide how much money you can afford to spend. Then stick to your budget. Don’t try to buy happiness with an avalanche of gifts.

Learn to say no.
Saying yes when you should say no can leave you feeling resentful and overwhelmed. Friends and colleagues will understand if you can’t participate in every project or activity.

Don’t abandon healthy habits.
Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Overindulgence only adds to your stress and guilt.

Resources

Here are some recommended resources to help you thrive this holiday season:

  • The holiday season is filled with celebrations, gift giving and reconnecting with family and friends. Sometimes additional commitments and expectations around the holidays can lead to unwanted stress and anxiety. This Holiday Toolkit provides education, support and other resources that can help you get by during this sometimes stressful time of year.
  • Introducing mindfulness into your daily routine can help relieve symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as having other benefits to both your physical and emotional health. The resources in the Mindfulness Toolkit can help you get started living mindfully.
  • The Wellbeing Place Blog provides you with a wide array of tips, tools and resources to improve your overall health and well-being.
  • Additional articles, tip sheets and resources can be found on this web portal by typing ‘holiday’ into ‘What’s on your mind?’.

SupportLinc Can Help

For confidential guidance, support, resources and referrals, contact SupportLinc by selecting an icon from the Access Bar on the home screen or by calling 1-888-881-5462.

 


Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression related to the change in seasons. For many, their symptoms start in the fall and continue into the winter months. Common signs and symptoms of SAD may include:

  • Loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed
  • Low energy
  • Changes in your sleep patterns
  • Changes in your appetite or weight
  • Feeling sluggish or slow
  • Moodiness or easily agitated
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Feelings of hopelessness

Take signs and symptoms of SAD seriously. While it is normal to have some days when you feel down, if your symptoms persist, or you turn to alcohol or other drugs to cope or if you have thoughts of suicide, you should seek professional help. There are a variety of treatments available for SAD. As with other types of depression, SAD can get worse if it’s not treated appropriately.

Resources

For more information on SAD and how to take steps to keep your mood and motivation steady throughout the year, here are some recommended resources:

  • Mental Health America (MHA) is a community-based nonprofit dedicated to promoting the overall mental health of all Americans. Click here for more information on Seasonal Affect Disorder.
  • The mission of The National Institute of Mental Health is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery and cure. Click here for more information on Seasonal Affect Disorder.
  • Introducing mindfulness into your daily routine can help relieve symptoms of anxiety and depression as well as having other benefits to both your physical and emotional health. The resources in the Mindfulness Toolkit can help you get started living mindfully.
  • The Wellbeing Place blog provides you with a wide array of tips, tools and resources to improve your overall health and well-being.
  • The ‘1in4’ Anti-Stigma Campaign focuses on normalizing the need for mental health resources and removing the stigma for those who want to access care. Click here to review a variety of helpful videos, links to resources, social media connections and tip sheets.

 

SupportLinc Can Help

For confidential guidance, support, resources and referrals, contact SupportLinc by selecting an icon from the Access Bar on the home screen.